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This one is about: Videoflouroscopy

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Subject: Videoflouroscopy

My daughter is having a videoflouroscopy next week. Her SP (speech pathologist) thought that the less my daughter knows about the procedure, the better and less anxious she would be.

Does anybody have any experience with this or have any information on this? I tried to look thru the autoresponders last nite and I couldn't find anything explaining the procedure.

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I beg to differ with you SP, but I have the opposite point of view -- I have always told my kids anything I happened to know about anything going on in their lives -- and I believe that that tack has paid off big time.

When they do the videoflouroscopy, they will have her drink some stuff (kinda yucky - but will help them see the inside of her when she talks. Then they will use a camera to take videos of the inside of her mouth. She will be asked to repeat the things the SP has her to say and she will be able (most of the time ... depending on the set-up) to watch what the inside of her mouth does when she says words.

The Videoflouroscopy, as I understand it, is less invasive than a nasoendoscopy, but requires cooperation. I think we have autoresponders on this.

Joanne
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Hello, My name is Betty; my 9 year old (adopted) daughter was born with a blcp. She has had 6 corrective surgical procedures (the last one just 3/17/98 on her nose). She has had several nasal endoscopy's and tolerated them ok.

She's not had a videofluoroscopy but all that is an x-ray procedure where the scan is recorded on video tape to be reviewed again at a later time. The patient drinks a "chalky" tasting solution that will show up on x-ray.

I sense some anger directed toward insensitive healthcare workers.....I'm not making excuses but there are CLODS where ever you go. Sometimes you have to ask the parent to step out because their reaction to the procedure frightens the child. Yes I am a health care professional; I'm a
Respiratory Care Practitioner.

I have always felt that children of any age deserve the respect of being told what to expect, especially regarding doctors and medical procedures well in advance. That way they know what to expect and will learn to trust you, because you tell them the truth.

I find that Bonnie's younger years have been easy.... It's these next few I'm sure I'll need help with.  As she grows up and enters those teen years where self image is so important my line about "Well, that's just the way God made you." Is changing to "God is tempering you and shaping you, I know He has something special in mind for you." I know this is true because she has a great deal of compassion and sympathy for others.

Good talking to you and reading what every one has to say....More later.
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Please don't read that I am angry toward healthcare professionals just because I disagreed with the Speech Pathologist about the videoflouroscopy.

It is the philosophy espoused by that person that I disagree with ... I do believe -- same as you -- that we owe our kids the truth. We need to allow them the opportunity to handle their news in the best way THEY can handle it, and they can't do that if they have not information.

Joanne
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Matt had this procedure done right before he turned 5 and I am not going to lie, it was total hell.  He screamed and flailed and threw a horrendous fit. Finally, my mother (bless her heart) told him, either he had to cooperate or the doctor was going to make grandma and mommy go outside and then he would be in there all alone. He did not like that thought one bit, so he finally cooperated. I had prepared him the best I could, but he is a child and they are only worried about what is happening now. Of course when I was explaining it to him, his mind was on something else, and when we got there to do it, it seemed of major importance to him. I guess that is just part of it. Good luck to you, I am not trying to be a downer, just thought you might like another angle on it.
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My daughter, currently 17 mos, PRS, palate repair in Dec. Everything went well. The DR that did the surgery wants to do this for her next month, she will be 18 months. He insists that everything is fine, but still would like this done. My husband and I have not agreed to this as of yet. She is extremely picky and stubborn about food/drink, I'm certain she won't drink anything given to her.  And she only says a few words, certainly not on command. I'm thinking at 18 mos this will be a waste. Any thoughts? Thanks.
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Yes, I have some thoughts here. When Sarah was really young we really had worries about her speech. This was suggested, but I was told never to let them do it before she was at least 4 or 5 because it is a test where they have to be very cooperative. Good luck with your decision.
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It depends on how they do it...the method changes for younger kids. They just sort of watch the video screen while the child babbles away. I've heard of it done on young kids, and I've heard good results.

Joanne
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We have to be careful that we don't confuse a videoflouroscopy with a nasal endoscopy here. I DO suggest parents wait until age 4 or 5 for the nasal endoscopy because it requires way more cooperation -- and a more yucky experience (putting the endoscope down the nose). I have heard of good results from very young kids getting a videoflouroscopy. I see the big problem as being getting a child to drink that stuff.

Joanne
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Hi Jean! Emily had the videoflouroscopy done twice. It really was no big deal. The fed her barium which smelled pretty good, and she ate it without complaint, and they x-rayed her while she was swallowing it. The procedure in Emily's case took maybe 10-15 minutes. She was maybe between 5 & 6 months old at the time. First they fed her through the bottle, and then they fed her by spoon. The x-ray was from her head to her stomach. They were mainly trying to watch her swallow. I don't know if these are done for other reasons, but this is what Emily's was done for. Any other questions, please do ask!


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